Case Studies > Murphy's Creek

Murphy's Creek

A world-first, the Flood Early Warning System can provide authorities with real-time video feeds and infra-red measuring system that is accurate to three millimetres.

Moreton Bay Systems, a world leader in flood mitigation imaging systems, has installed Australia’s first Radar based Flood Early Warning System (FEWS) at Murphy’s Creek near Toowoomba, QLD.
The Spring Bluff site on Murphy’s Creek was where the four meter wall of water originated in January 2011 devastating the Lockyer Valley region and causing horrific loss of life in the town of Grantham.

The FEWS was commissioned by the Lockyer Valley Regional Council and is one of several which are planned to be installed at critical locations throughout the area to warn authorities and local residents of impending floods.

The Digilant® Flood Early Warning System™ is a radar based water level measuring & imaging system for monitoring rivers & waterways, culverts, river crossings and flood risk areas.
The Megapixel imaging system is solar powered making it completely independent of external power!

    

                                            Daytime Image                                      Night-time image in torrential rain

The image and water level data are sent via a 3G wireless network to the Digilant FEW management system which in turn alerts the Lockyer Valley Council Emergency Monitoring Centre, Bureau of Meteorology and Emergency Services. The images can also be made available to the general public via Council websites so that informed decisions can be made by individuals on the safest evacuation routes.

Under normal conditions the system sends images and water level data on a regular basis however when the water level rises quickly, the system automatically changes to high speed imaging, immediately warning monitoring authorities and providing real time flood status information.

The Digilant FEW management system can also automatically activate warning sirens and electronic road signs to close bridges during a flood emergency.